Handheld Vocal Microphones

Audix handheld vocal microphones are popular with professional performers, live sound engineers, and podcasters and can be seen and heard on stages and in studios worldwide.

Artist: Pepper
Photo: Sean McCracken

Condenser or Dynamic?

Dynamic vocal microphones are the most popular type of vocal microphone for live performances because of their durability, flexibility, pattern control and cost. Between 1986 and 1989, Audix broke new ground with the OM Series of vocal microphones with VLM™ (Very Low Mass) technology.

These microphones received critical acclaim and set new performance records for clarity, SPL (Sound Pressure Level) handling and gain before feedback, particularly on stages with very high noise environments.

The condenser (or capacitor) microphone, was invented at Bell Labs in 1916. As opposed to a dynamic microphone with a moving coil, a thin diaphragm is located alongside a stationary plate with an electrical current running through them.

When the diaphragm is moved by sound vibrations, a change in the distance between the plates occurs. This change between the diaphragm and back stationary plate also changes the strength or capacitance of the electrical charge. This change produces an electrical current.

This process is referred to as the electrostatic principal.

The initial current is surprisingly small but is enhanced by an in-line preamp that is either part of the microphone circuit or is provided by a secondary preamp adapter.

The end result is a microphone with much greater sensitivity than a dynamic microphone.

Condenser microphones also require a power source, provided via phantom power or from a small battery.

Power is necessary for establishing the capacitor plate voltage and is also needed to power the microphone electronics.

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